Authentic Buffalo Wings with Blue Cheese Dressing

Recipes in this PostAuthentic Buffalo Wings

I got this recipe from my son’s dad, who grew up in Rochester, New York, and he insists this is the original recipe. Whether it really is or not, I don’t know, but I do know that it’s really tasty. Our son, who said he didn’t like wings, when I made a batch of these Buffalo Wings one day for his father, and a few were left, said “Mom, are there any more?”.

I think what sets these wings apart from others is that they are brined before they are fried, so there is flavor not only in the sauce, but deep in the wing itself. I always use fresh whole wings, not frozen. The frozen wings, once they are defrosted, shrivel up and are tiny. Don’t throw away the wing tips, either. They don’t have any meat on them, but the nooks and crannies absorb sauce to slurp, or if you don’t want to bother with them, put them in your freezer for chicken stock.

This Blue Cheese Dressing is the recipe my mother made. It is very simple. Please buy a wedge of blue cheese, don’t buy the already crumbled because that is whatever has been gathered up that has fallen off the larger pieces. It’s usually dried out with little flavor. I recommend Danish Blue Cheese as it is very tasty, and relatively easy to find. I don’t recommend Gorgonzola because it’s flavor is too mild to stand up to the wing sauce, and Roquefort, as much as I love it, is a little too strong and would fight with the sauce.

Authentic Buffalo Wings with Blue Cheese Dressing

Prep Time: 1 hour

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

Category: Appetizers

Cuisine: American

These wings are a great appetizer, or make a good meal accompanied by a salad and baked potato.

Ingredients

For the Brine
1 tablespoon sea salt
1 tablespoon Boswell Seasoned Salt
1 teaspoon brown sugar
1/2 cup cold water
For the Wings
3 lbs whole chicken wings
vegetable oil for frying, olive not recommended
For the Sauce
1 stick unsalted butter
1/2 cup Louisiana Hot Sauce of your choice (Crystal is great)
1 egg
For the Dressing
2 tablespoons or more good blue cheese, crumbled
1/2 cup sour cream
1/3 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons plain yogurt (Blue Mountain is wonderful)
Freshly grated black pepper

Instructions

    Separate the wing parts. Using a sharp knife, separate the drumette from the wingette and tip.
    Please consider including the tips in your dish, otherwise, please put them in the freezer and save them for stock. Put all the parts into a large bowl, add the brining ingredients, turn all around so all the pieces can get covered, and refrigerate for about an hour.
    While the chicken is brining, make the dressing. Combine all the dressing ingredients together in a bowl and mix well. I usually make mine in a small food processor so it gets very creamy. Put the dressing it its serving bowl, and refrigerate it until time to serve. If you are going to want to serve with fresh vegetables like celery or carrots, now would be the time to prepare them as well.
    Remove the chicken from the brine and pat dry. They will have absorbed the flavors by now, so no worries about patting them dry. But you want them dry so they crisp up well.
    Heat oil in a large pan to 335 degrees. While that is happening, get your drying rack and absorbent paper ready. Also get your instant read thermometer handy.
    When the oil is ready, put a few pieces of chicken, maybe 5, in the pan. Cook for about 5 minutes, then turn and cook for another 5 minutes, or until the chicken has nicely browned and has reached an internal temperature of 165 on an instant read thermometer. Drain on the paper lined drying rack. Continue cooking the rest of the wings in batches until all have been cooked.
    While you are frying the chicken, put the butter in a sauce pan and heat it until it melts. Watch carefully that it does not burn, then remove from the heat and set aside. When all the chicken has been cooked, in a separate bowl, but the hot sauce and butter. Mix vigorously. Break the egg into a small bowl, and thoroughly scramble it. Add a small amount of the hot sauce mixture to the egg and mix it thoroughly. This will temper the egg. Add the tempered egg mixture to the remaining sauce mixture and mix thoroughly.
    Put the chicken wings in a large bowl, preferably one with a cover, pour the sauce over and mix the sauce so every piece of chicken gets covered. If you have a cover for your bowl, you can just shake it, it's a lot easier.
    Plate up by putting the dressing in the center of a large plate or platter, then arrange the wings and whatever fresh vegetables you may or may not have included. Serve immediately and enjoy!
https://the-good-plate.com/2018/02/authentic-buffalo-wings-blue-cheese-dressing/

Fry Baby, Fry! Beer Battered Fried Fish and Onion Rings, Avocado Fries

Recipes in this PostRice Flour Beer Batter Fried Fish, Onion Rings, Avocado Fries and Stuffed Wontons

I don’t eat a lot of fried food, but sometimes, you have to fry. I wanted to make Avocado Fries, and considering that there was already going to be a pan of hot oil, why not throw some other things in as well?

My friend, Amber Lewis, chief cook and bottle washer, and event planner extraordinaire at Cool Dreams, makes these wonderful Bacon Wrapped Dates and Artichoke Stuffed Wontons. She suggested we make fried onions to go with our other appetizers, and I said we should make beer battered fish to go with it.

Amber’s son, Zeik, helped make sauces, including Chipotle Lime Sauce, for the onions rings and avocado fries.

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Crab Shrimp Cakes with Louis Sauce

Recipes in this PostGarnished Crab Cake Picture by Stu Spivack at Flickr

When I was a little girl living in Germany, my mother used to get frozen crab cakes. I loved them. A few years ago, I found a package of Zatarain’s crab cake mix, and I made it with imitation crab. Yup, you heard me right – imitation crab.

Here’s my thoughts on imitation crab. What is imitation crab? Imitation crab is made from surimi, a concoction of fish, usually pollock, a binder and flavoring. I never think of imitation crab as crab, I think of it as Krab.

I went to the market yesterday, and stood there thinking about what to make for Friday Food. Krab was on sale, and there was a nice package of small bay shrimp on sale as well. Since I was going to be making this for Amber’s family as well as mine, I got both, and thought I would mix them together.

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Seafood Stuffed Avocado with Marinated Asparagus

Recipes in this Post

Shimp and Crawfish Nestled in Avocado - Asparagus Flanks Each Side

I am so happy that the warmer weather is here, and salads are the way to go. Composed salads made by stuffing a fruit or vegetable are a favorite in our house. I found crayfish at the store, and bought some shrimp to go with it. Since we usually eat seafood on Fridays, using the shrimp and crayfish to stuff an avocado seemed like a perfect idea. Spane and I also love asparagus, which looks lovely on a plate. It is also the year that Haas avocados are plentiful.

Avocados produce fruit prolifically every two years, that’s why they are expensive one year, and really cheap the next. Did you know that all commercial, fruit-bearing Hass avocado trees have been grown from grafted seedlings propagated from a single tree? The tree was grown from a seed bought by Rudolph Hass in 1926 from A. R. Rideout of Whittier, California. The mother tree stood for many years in front of a residence in La Habra Heights. The tree died when it was 76 years old and was cut down on 11 September 2002 after a ten-year fight with root rot. Two plaques by the private residence at 426 West Road mark the spot where it grew. Because of the avocado, just about any food with California in the name has avocados. I love ’em.

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