Braised Pork with Leek Sauce

Recipes in this PostBriased Pork with Leek Sauce

I was surprised at just how good this came out when I made it. Even Spane liked it once I explained what leeks are.

Leeks, I have told him and others, are a mildly sweet member of the onion family. They look like giant green onions. The only part that is edible is the white part, the green part is too tough to eat. No matter, there is plenty of the white part.

You don’t have to use a pork loin to make this. Pork chops would be fine. You could even use a rather tough piece of beef that does well with braising.

Continue reading

Chicken with Mushrooms in Wine Sauce

Chicken with Mushrooms in Wine Sauce

Recipes in this Post

My best friend’s mother, Joan, used to make the best chicken. I was very close to Joan, and paid attention when she cooked. I think this was my favorite, and she was nice enough to give me the recipe.

I loved Joan for other reasons, too. Joan was the manager of a high-end gift shop in Beverly Hills, and she had very good taste. Her house was beautifully decorated, and well-organized. Everything had a place, and everything had a job, even the legs on the cast iron dining room table. It’s job was to bite us on the toe as we passed by it and weren’t paying attention.

Joan taught me a lot of stuff. She taught me the right jewelry to wear with what outfit, she taught me the importance of being organized, she taught me how to make the Hot Dogs with Mashed Potatoes and Cheese (Spane’s favorite), and she taught me how to make this chicken dish. She loved me like her own daughter, and I loved her like the mother I lost when I was 15 years old. When I moved out of her place, she gave me metal prep bowls and a stainless steel wok. Despite all the moving I have done, I still have those bowls and that wok, and use them frequently.

Fresh Water ChestnutsThe only thing Joan did not teach me was about fresh water chestnuts. My grocer taught me about those. They look like ginger fingers, and sliced thinly, they are very crisp with a nice flavor. I don’t know about you, but I always avoid water chestnuts when I find them in Chinese food because those have no flavor. But, the fresh ones? They have a very subtle flavor, almost like a potato. If you can find them, I highly recommend them.

Sadly, Joan died just before Spane was born, but I know she watches over us. I love you, Mom!

Continue reading

Oxen Shvantz Suppe – Braised Oxtails

Recipes in this Post

Ox-tail served over noodles

When I was a little girl growing up in Germany, when we had Oxen Shvantz Suppe it was always a real treat. Braised with wine for hours they are tender and juicy. They are wonderful on a cold, rainy winter day.

What are ox tails, you ask? Well, they are the tail of an ox or steer which is cut into 2 to 3 inch pieces. They are very meaty and make a nice gravy, all on their own. How do you eat ox tails? You get most of the meat out with your fork, then you pick the piece up and suck all the goodness out of the bone. A bone bowl is a good thing to have on the table when you are serving ox tails.

When you go to buy ox tails, be sure and get them from a reputable butcher. The bony part should be bright white, the sinew pink, and the meat should be nice and red. I was lucky, my butcher brought out a tail and cut it there in front of me with his incredibly sharp knife. You can’t get any fresher than that.

Continue reading

Stuffed Mushrooms in Wine Sauce

Recipes in this Postushrooms in Wine Sauce

Love Mushrooms

I love mushrooms, and lately I have been finding nice big ones at the local corner store. I picked up six of them and decided to wait and have them stuffed for our meatless Friday meal.

The Nesco is the perfect appliance to cook them, as they do not dry out, and can steam in wine. Clean up is a snap, and your kitchen does not heat up.

Continue reading

Salmon Corn Cakes from A Taste of History

According to my web site statistics, some of you have been searching for the recipe for the Salmon Corn Cakes from A Taste of History. Apparently, there is only the video and the book, but no transcribed recipe on the Internet. I was curious so I watched the video, and I’m going to make these, and I thought it was a good idea to write everything down before I make them. I don’t have a picture yet, but when I do make them, there will be a picture, or maybe even a video!

One of the things I really liked about the recipe was that the salmon was fresh, poached in white wine. You could probably use canned salmon, but the flavor would be way off.

The other thing was the use of roasted corn. I saw that the chef roasted the corn with the husks on and did not let the kernels get roasted at all. I would let the kernels get a little roasted, just to add flavor.

The whole dish could be prepared on a Weber, or in a hearth if you want to stick with the 18th century. Of course, it could also be prepared on a regular stove, but we’re trying to be a little authentic here, right? We’re going to do this on The Weber.
Continue reading