Pork Loin Roast with Tangy Lemon Sauce

Pork Loin Roast with Tangy Lemon Sauce and Couscous SaladPork Loin Roast with Tangy Lemon Sauce

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Labor Day is such an important day to remember those who fought for good working conditions and a living wage. It’s also a fine excuse to make some good food. Whilst looking through Paula Deen’s Southern Cooking Bible, I came across a recipe for pork roast which gave me the idea to make this pork loin roast with tangy lemon sauce.

Pork loin roast is one of my favorite meats. I like mine on the rare side, just pink on the inside. I usually give the end slices to Spane because he likes his a little more cooked. There is no excuse for serving a dried out, gray colored roast of pork. Armed with a good instant thermometer, you can serve perfect pork at 140 degrees. Just make sure to let the roast rest for about 10 minutes before carving it. I use an electric knife because it makes the nicest slices.

If you want to make this on the grill, more power to you! Pork roast is great on the grill, but you have to use the Indirect method. This means you put a pile of hot coals on one side of the grill, and a pan of liquid under the meat, which gives the meat a nice, steamy place to slowly cook. If you want, you can use beer, wine or fruit juice for the liquid.
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Braised Pork with Leek Sauce

Recipes in this PostBriased Pork with Leek Sauce

I was surprised at just how good this came out when I made it. Even Spane liked it once I explained what leeks are.

Leeks, I have told him and others, are a mildly sweet member of the onion family. They look like giant green onions. The only part that is edible is the white part, the green part is too tough to eat. No matter, there is plenty of the white part.

You don’t have to use a pork loin to make this. Pork chops would be fine. You could even use a rather tough piece of beef that does well with braising.

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Fennel Cashew Crusted Pork Loin

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Fennel Cashew Crusted Pork Loin

We really like pork loin in our house. It’s small, and cooked correctly, tender and moist. The problem with pork is that it can dry out easily, so it is important to keep it moist, or cook it so that it retains its moisture.

I make Pork Chops with Fennel, and I wanted to do something similar with my pork loin, but still keep it moist since I was going to roast the meat.

I put all the ingredients for my crust in a small food processor, then mixed that with Panko bread crumbs. I washed my pork loin under cold running water, patted it thoroughly dry, then coated it liberally with olive oil. Coating it with the olive oil did two things:

  1. It allowed the crust to stick to the meat.
  2. It added a moisture that patting the meat had removed

I let the crusted roast rest in the refrigerator for a half an hour to let the crust harden and make a better moisture barrier. Knowing that it wasn’t going to be producing a lot of liquid, I put it on a rimmed baking sheet covered with foil, and cooked it in a medium oven while my Blue Cheese Risotto with Merlot was cooking. Then I let it rest for three minutes while a microwaved broccoli for our Oscar Party dinner. It was a show stopper!

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Szechuan Orange Pork Loin Roast

Recipes in This PostSzechwan Orange Pork Loin Roast

My son loves roast pork loin, and I do, too. It’s so tender, and flavorful, but can easily take on other flavors. One of the best things about pork loin is having a sandwich from the left overs. Chinese pork roast sandwiches are particularly good.

Originally, for my Chinese dinner, I was going to make the same Asian Pork Roast I made for Ascencia for Chinese New Year 2013, but when I looked in my pantry today, I spied a jar of orange marmalade and knew I had to make Szechuan Orange Pork Loin Roast instead. Cooking it in the Nesco made it simple, and kept the roast very moist and tender.

If you want to make this, and I hope you do, please understand that it is quite spicy, so you will probably want to have something with it to cool the palate. Fried rice is a good idea, or Asian Coleslaw. We kicked our dinner up a notch and had Szechuan Green Beans as well.

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