Ham Steaks with Russian Red Eye Gravy and Cranberry Almond Pilaf

Recipes in this PostHam Steak with Russian Red Eye Gravy and Cranberry Almond Rice Pilaf

Sometimes, you need a little Christmas, right this very minute. That’s why we love ham steaks, because you satisfy your craving for a good piece of ham, without having to cook a whole ham. If you’re lucky, you even get to have the bone with the luscious marrow.

When I make a whole ham, I usually make a glaze of Russian mustard and Sour Cherry preserves. It’s sweet and a little hot, and definitely wakes up the ham. One of the traditional gravies for ham steak is Red Eye gravy, which has, you guessed it, coffee in it. I wanted to incorporate both.

Since The Good Plate is all about deconstructing packaged foods, and one everyone likes a lot is Rice-a-Roni. Rice-a-Roni is rice pilaf, but with way too much salt and other preservatives. There’s no need to use the box, just get the ingredients together and make it from scratch – you know what’s going in it, and you can add whatever you want.

Over the weekend, I made a salad with a new dressing. It was fresh dill and lime, and Amber absolutely loved it. She asked for it again tonight, so I’m including the recipe for it here.

Remember, if you’re having a ham steak, and you don’t want your bone, just give it to me!

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Salmon Corn Cakes from A Taste of History

According to my web site statistics, some of you have been searching for the recipe for the Salmon Corn Cakes from A Taste of History. Apparently, there is only the video and the book, but no transcribed recipe on the Internet. I was curious so I watched the video, and I’m going to make these, and I thought it was a good idea to write everything down before I make them. I don’t have a picture yet, but when I do make them, there will be a picture, or maybe even a video!

One of the things I really liked about the recipe was that the salmon was fresh, poached in white wine. You could probably use canned salmon, but the flavor would be way off.

The other thing was the use of roasted corn. I saw that the chef roasted the corn with the husks on and did not let the kernels get roasted at all. I would let the kernels get a little roasted, just to add flavor.

The whole dish could be prepared on a Weber, or in a hearth if you want to stick with the 18th century. Of course, it could also be prepared on a regular stove, but we’re trying to be a little authentic here, right? We’re going to do this on The Weber.
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Myriad Deviled Eggs and Boston Baked Beans – Happy Anniversary Amber and Stevie!

Myriad Deviled EggsRecipes in this Post

Today, May 29, 2011, is my good friends, Amber and Stevie Lewis’ sixteenth wedding anniversary. They are having a party, and Stevie said he wanted Baked Beans and Amber said she wanted Deviled Eggs. I happily volunteered to make both.

I had never made Boston Baked Beans before, but I had recently found a recipe I wanted to try, and this was the perfect opportunity.

I also wanted to make the eggs special, so I decided to garnish them with different toppings. My Myriad Deviled Eggs turned out beautiful!

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