Enchiladas with Three Pepper Sauce

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Enchiladas with Three Pepper Sauce

Enchiladas with Three Pepper Sauce

I have been making these Enchiladas with Three Pepper Sauce for years. They are similar to Enchiladas Verde or Enchiladas Suizas. Even though there are three different types of peppers in the sauce, Pablano, Anaheim, and Jalapeño, the sauce is very mild. Because the peppers and tomatoes are charred, the flavor is really spectacular.

When I was a little girl, living in Germany, my father used to make enchiladas. My father was a major in the U.S. Army, and he loved to make Mexican food. I’m not sure why he wanted to do this, or even where he managed to get ingredients, but he made flaming salsa and flaming enchiladas on a regular basis. I learned early on to have a big glass of milk with my dinner when the Major cooked. My mother could never understand how I could gobble up my father’s spicy food. She used to kid me and tell me I was Paul Fierro’s child, and not my father’s. For those of you who want to know, yes I am most definitely my father’s daughter. Oddly enough, when I finally met Paul Fierro, I told my mother she was crazy to not have married him, he was gorgeous, even to a preteen like me! I guess there must have been some osmosis genetic thing going on, apparently, Paul Fierro’s mother made killer enchiladas, and even though I’m not related to her, I make killer enchilada’s too.

You will find when you make this that it’s a lot easier if you have a food processor and a stand mixer. You’ll want to grate the cheese, chop vegetables and chicken in the food processor, and bring it all together in the stand mixer. Yes you can do it all by hand, but be prepared for a long day and tired muscles.

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Chimichurri Flap Steak Tacos

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Meat grilled and ready for chopping

Meat grilled and ready for chopping

The word Chimichurri reminds me so much of Chim-Chim Cher-ee that I can’t help but get the song stuck in my head. I would change the words a bit though, “Good luck will rub off when I barbecue you, or blow me a kiss (smoke), and that’s lucky, too.” Chimichurri is a sauce for grilled meats that originated in Argentina. It is made from finely chopped parsley, minced garlic, olive oil, oregano, and white or red vinegar. It also makes a fine marinade for flap steak on the grill. Here’s the real words:

Chim chiminey
Chim chiminey
Chim chim cher-oo!
Good luck will rub off when

I shake ‘ands with you
Or blow me a kiss
And that’s lucky too

Chim-Chim Cher-ee from “Mary Poppins”, composed by Robert B. Sherman and Richard M. Sherman

The best meat for this is flap steak, because it is thin, meaty and marinades beautifully. It should be cooked on the grill on high heat, directly over the coals. Let it rest for a few minutes before chopping it up. Flap steak is available in most supermarkets.

Usually, I heat tortillas on the stove top, and I thought to myself, why not just put them on the grill? You know what, they were nice and soft, and fantastic!

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Barbecued Mexican Shrimp Stuffed Red Snapper Packets

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Barbecued Mexican Shrimp Stuffed Red Snapper Packets, with avocado, Roasted Peppers, tortillas and cilantro

Barbecued Mexican Shrimp Stuffed Red Snapper Packets, with avocado, Roasted Peppers, tortillas and cilantro

Well, our Weber is going South of the Border tonight, and I’m making Barbecued Mexican Shrimp Stuffed Red Snapper Packets with Roasted Red Peppers, Avocado and tortillas.

I’ve really been into grilling for the past few days, Barbecued Asian Pork Chops, Barbecued Fillet Mignon with Blue Cheese Crumbles, and last night I barbecued a chicken. Tonight is Friday, so no meat. But I did have some red snapper in the freezer, and some cooked shrimp as well. I thought I could stuff the snapper with the shrimp, and as I was chopping it up, it occurred to me if I added spices and cabbage, it could become South of the Border.

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Easy Meaty Chili

Easy Meaty Chili

Chili with fixin's

Sometimes, on a cold day that looks like it might rain, you have to have chili. Usually, I make a big pot of it, and it cooks a long time to let the beans get nice and soft. Sometimes, you just don’t have that kind of time, but you don’t want something that came out of a can.

I don’t buy the Chili mix in the bag. I make my own, and you should, too. It’s very simple, and better because you can control the heat and you know what’s in it. Basically, it’s a mixture of chilies, cumin and a little salt.

If you live in California, you probably have access to fresh Anaheim chilies, if you live in New Mexico, you have the New Mexico chili which is a bit hotter than the Anaheim. Both chilies have thick skin, so they should be charred before use. When making my chili, I charred two nice big red bells peppers as well.

How to Char Chilies

Charring chilies is very simple. You need four things, the chilies themselves, a gas stove top, long tongs and a plastic bag (the one the chilies came in is fine). Put the gas flame up as high as it will go, and just lay the chili on the burner. Use the tongs to turn the chilies as they char. When most of the skin has been charred, put the chili in the plastic bag, close it, and let the chili steam in the bag. When the chili is cool enough to handle, remove the charred skin under running water. Not only is this a great way to skin a chili pepper, it also give the chili a nice roasted flavor. Of course, if you want really smoky flavor, do it on the Weber!

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Mexican Feast – Coleslaw, Black Bean Dip and Taquitos with White Sauce

Mexican Feast

Mexican Feast

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This afternoon when I was at the local store, I had a taste for Mexican food. I already had frozen taquitos in my freezer (I’m too lazy to make them myself), so all I needed was avocado. Well, surprise, surprise my little store didn’t have any, so I decided to make the white sauce similar to the fish taco white sauce at Rubio’s.

I also had some cabbage in the refrigerator. I love cabbage and it’s very good with Mexican food. I picked up a can of black beans so I could make the same black bean dip I used for my Black Bean Tacos.

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Blue Ribbon for Pork Roast with Balsamic Rub

I received a Blue Ribbon for Roast Pork with Balsamic Mustard Rub!

Spane and I with the Blue Ribbon for Pork Roast with Balsamic Mustard Rub

Spane and I with the Blue Ribbon for Pork Roast with Balsamic Mustard Rub

Well, what to you know about that! Spane got the mail today, and he said I had mail, and handed me a padded package. I didn’t think it was for me, I hadn’t ordered anything.

So, I tore the envelope open, and inside was a Blue Ribbon and a certificate from Just A Pinch, where I had submitted my recipe for Pork Roast with Balsamic Mustard Rub. I was stunned, to say the least, and then I visited their site, and this is what their Test Kitchen had to say:

The seasoning in this recipe is a perfect blend. Spicy and flavorful, hearty and super satisfying… Enjoy!
Just A Pinch!

Well, thank you so much Just a Pinch, specifically Janet Tharp, the head tester, chief cook and bottle washer!

I have to highly recommend this site as not only are they hosting one of my recipes, there are literally hundreds of fabulous recipes available. This is place I bookmarked and visit often.

I have also joined a few discussion groups at Just a Pinch, and would like to visit other food bloggers who are members of Just a Pinch. I would like to share their recipes here as well, with permission, of course.

Good cooking to all!

Recipe: Pork Loin with Balsamic Mustard Rub

Ingredients

  • 1 pork loin roast
  • 1/4 cup Balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon Zatarains or other Creole mustard
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 2 teaspoons onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon thyme

Instructions

  1. Mix all the ingredients together and rub this on the roast, coating it well. Let it sit in the refrigerator for at least a half an hour before putting it on the grill.
  2. When putting it on the grill, put it on direct heat, and rotate to seal all the sides, about five minutes, then cook the rest of the time in indirect heat, covered until the roast reaches 165 degrees, about 20 minutes.

Variations

If you are going to be doing this indoors, then heat an iron skillet on the stove top, brown all sides of the roast, then put in the oven for the rest of time, about 20 minutes.

Culinary tradition: Creole

Copyright © The Good Plate.
Recipe by Adrienne Boswell.
Microformatting by hRecipe.