Dicken’s Christmas – Roast Goose with Chestnut Stuffing

Your Goose is Cooked!

Dickens’ Christmas Dinner Menu

I lucked out this year and got a free range goose! I was so happy when I found it that I was jumping up and down. It was going to be a Dickens’ Christmas after all!

There never was such a goose. Bob said he didn’t believe there ever was such a goose cooked. Its tenderness and flavour, size and cheapness1, were the themes of universal admiration….

In half a minute Mrs Cratchit entered — flushed, but smiling proudly — with the pudding, like a speckled cannon-ball, so hard and firm, blazing in half of half-a-quartern of ignited brandy, and bedight with Christmas holly stuck into the top.

`A Merry Christmas to us all, my dears. God bless us.’
Which all the family re-echoed. `God bless us every one.’ said Tiny Tim, the last of all.

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens 1843

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Jolly Roger Cake of the Pirate Rack Rachham with Cannon Balls

Recipes in This Post
Jolly Roger Pirate Chocolate Cake

Jolly Roger of Rack Rachham

I just love marzipan. It is so forgiving, easy to work with, and delicious. As a child living in Germany, I remember every year at Christmas time, the bakeries would put out a nativity scene made from marzipan, with the structures made from gingerbread. These were true artisans. So, when I decided to make a Jolly Roger cake, I wanted to do something in that tradition.

Originally, I was going to make large cannon (rum) balls for Spane’s pirate themed party, but I soon realized that I could not put a candle on them the same way I could a cake. I still made the rum balls, and they turned out wonderful as well.

Making the cake was easy. I used my standard chocolate cake recipe, using Hershey’s Dark Cocoa, with the addition of a little Chipotle powder and Saigon cinnamon. Black food coloring made for an intensely dark chocolate.

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Day of the Dead Brownies

Crystal Skull on Exhibit at the British Muesum picture by Rafał Chałgasiewicz  at Wikipedia

Crystal Skull at the British museum

I made Aztec Day of the Dead Brownies for Caleb’s birthday present, but you could also make them any time of year, and just change the marzipan top. I used the Crystal Skull at the British Museum as my reference when making the marzipan forms. Spane helped and he did a great job.

I suppose I am brownie challenged, or lazy. One of these days, I promise to make brownies from scratch, but for now, the Betty Crocker Frosted brownies in the box had Box Tops (you need those when you have a child in a public school), they’re good, and easy to make.

But, I wanted the brownies I was making for Caleb to be special. Considering that Halloween precedes the Day of the Dead celebration, I thought it would good to put some of the spices the ancient Aztecs used in their chocolate.

Rituals celebrating the deaths of ancestors have been observed by Mexican indigenous civilizations perhaps for as long as 2,500–3,000 years. The festival fell in the ninth month of the Aztec calendar, about the beginning of August, and was celebrated for an entire month. The festivities were dedicated to the god known as the “Lady of the Dead”, corresponding to the modern Catrina.

In most regions of Mexico, November 1 honors children and infants, whereas deceased adults are honored on November 2. This is indicated by generally referring to November 1 mainly as Día de los Inocentes (“Day of the Innocents”) but also as Día de los Angelitos (“Day of the Little Angels”) and November 2 as Día de los Muertos or Día de los Difuntos (“Day of the Dead”).

WikiPedia

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The Coleslaw Recipe Collection

Recipes in this PostCabbage

I love cabbage, all year round, but in the summer time, when it’s hot and you want something cool, coleslaw always comes to mind.

Everyone has their favorite, whether it’s a recipe passed down from their grandmother, some kind of science experiment, or even KFC (which really is good coleslaw).

I have a few recipes on this site for coleslaw, and I found one at Miss in the Kitchen that I really want to try. So, without further ado, here is my Coleslaw Collection – well so far, that is.

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