Braised Pork with Leek Sauce

Recipes in this PostBriased Pork with Leek Sauce

I was surprised at just how good this came out when I made it. Even Spane liked it once I explained what leeks are.

Leeks, I have told him and others, are a mildly sweet member of the onion family. They look like giant green onions. The only part that is edible is the white part, the green part is too tough to eat. No matter, there is plenty of the white part.

You don’t have to use a pork loin to make this. Pork chops would be fine. You could even use a rather tough piece of beef that does well with braising.

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Oxen Shvantz Suppe – Braised Oxtails

Recipes in this Post

Ox-tail served over noodles

When I was a little girl growing up in Germany, when we had Oxen Shvantz Suppe it was always a real treat. Braised with wine for hours they are tender and juicy. They are wonderful on a cold, rainy winter day.

What are ox tails, you ask? Well, they are the tail of an ox or steer which is cut into 2 to 3 inch pieces. They are very meaty and make a nice gravy, all on their own. How do you eat ox tails? You get most of the meat out with your fork, then you pick the piece up and suck all the goodness out of the bone. A bone bowl is a good thing to have on the table when you are serving ox tails.

When you go to buy ox tails, be sure and get them from a reputable butcher. The bony part should be bright white, the sinew pink, and the meat should be nice and red. I was lucky, my butcher brought out a tail and cut it there in front of me with his incredibly sharp knife. You can’t get any fresher than that.

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Hoppin’ John, Kale and Corn Bread with Gold Nuggets – New Years Day Lucky Food

Hoppin John on top of Jasmine Rice with Scallion Garnish

Recipes in this Post

Almost every year, I bake a ham for Christmas so that I can have the bone for New Year’s Day. Of course, this year I roasted a goose, so I had no ham bone. Luckily, my good friend Stevie Lewis, saved me the bone from his family’s Christmas ham. From this bone, I make Hoppin John, and old Southern dish of black-eyed peas, ham, and rice. With it I serve steamed Kale and cornbread.

There is quite the long tradition with this meal. The black-eyed peas are said to represent coins, the kale is green like money, and the cornbread is golden to represent gold. Eating this for New Year’s Day is supposed to bring good fortune for the New Year.

Well, it might not bring any more money into your purse, but it is very economical. It’s a break for all the heavy holiday foods. It’s also very good for you. Black-eyed peas are high in protein, iron, zinc and potassium. Kale has anti-cancer properties. Corn bread, if you don’t put tons on butter on it, is also good for you.

I have been making this meal for years, but alas, the only photo is the one at the top. But, I’ll take pictures when I make it, so if you’re here after January, 2012, there are probably more pictures.

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The Year in Review – Appetizers, Drinks and Light Meals to Bring in the New Year

Champagne

Well, December 25 is over, and now all we have to wait for is the New Year celebrations. I thought I would make a list of some recipes that have been popular this year, or you might want to make for your New Year’s Eve event.

Every year, I make a special New Year’s Day dish, but I’m going to hold that one for another post, so stay tuned. In the meantime, I think that you might find yourself making some of 2011’s most popular recipes for your own festivities.

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Pirate Party Menu and Recipes

Jolly Roger

Jolly Roger of Rack Rachham

We’re going to have good pirate themes food for Spane’s Eighth Birthday Party on November 19, 2011. Just as I did for Spane’s seventh birthday, I have loaded up my Lotus Organizer and started my recipes and grocery list. I thought I would share the menu and recipes. Note that all of these recipes can be used for other occasions.

Pirate Party Menu

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