Asian Ginger Tuna Steaks and Caramelized Carrots

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A few weeks ago, there was a lovely tuna steak on sale at the local supermarket. It was just big enough for Spane and I to share. I got it, put it in the freezer and forgot about it. This afternoon, I took it out for dinner.

Spane has been bugging me to make Macaroni and Cheese, and I went to my local Vons to get the cheese I needed a few days ago. I really think that Mac and Cheese requires white cheddar. This time, I had a little bit of medium cheddar left over, some bits of Colby from a cheese tray, and some mozzarella I used to make Risotto Rice Balls. I did not have bread crumbs, I used them all up with the Rice Balls and the Chicken Croquetas, so I took a large heel of sour dough and ran it through the food processor,and used that.

The cheese tray that we had on Monday night had the ubiquitous carrot pieces, and there were some of those left that would make a good vegetable to go with our dinner. I decided I would make the carrots the same way my mother made them.

I decided to use an Asian marinade for my tuna. Spane really loved it, with the carrots and, of course, the Mac and Cheese.

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Salmon Corn Cakes from A Taste of History

According to my web site statistics, some of you have been searching for the recipe for the Salmon Corn Cakes from A Taste of History. Apparently, there is only the video and the book, but no transcribed recipe on the Internet. I was curious so I watched the video, and I’m going to make these, and I thought it was a good idea to write everything down before I make them. I don’t have a picture yet, but when I do make them, there will be a picture, or maybe even a video!

One of the things I really liked about the recipe was that the salmon was fresh, poached in white wine. You could probably use canned salmon, but the flavor would be way off.

The other thing was the use of roasted corn. I saw that the chef roasted the corn with the husks on and did not let the kernels get roasted at all. I would let the kernels get a little roasted, just to add flavor.

The whole dish could be prepared on a Weber, or in a hearth if you want to stick with the 18th century. Of course, it could also be prepared on a regular stove, but we’re trying to be a little authentic here, right? We’re going to do this on The Weber.
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Red Pepper Stuffed with Crab Salad and Guacamole

Recipes in the postRed Pepper Stuffed with Crab Salad and Guacamole

I love this Red Pepper Stuffed with Crab Salad and Guacamole. Okay, so some of you who have been here before know that I am Roman Catholic. Some of you may think that Catholics don’t have to eat fish on Fridays, and you would be correct, they don’t. Continue reading

Poached Salmon Tacos with Avocado Salsa

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I love salmon, and I love avocado, and I love tacos! What could be better for a hot summer day than Poached Salmon Tacos with Avocado Salsa? When I was at a discount store with my friend Amber, I found green cactus tacos. I also had some red cabbage in the refrigerator and I thought that would look nice with the red and green. Continue reading

Friday Food on a Saturday? Salmon in a foil pouch

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642_Salmon En PapierI haven’t been sticking to my Friday night fish routine lately, but on Thursday, I really had a craving for fish. Friday night, Amber and I walked over to the local supermarket and I looked for some interesting fish.

I won’t eat the farm raised salmon.  The first time I saw that it had dye in it, I asked the butcher why it had dye in it, and he shrugged his shoulders.  Of course, that meant I had to do some research and what I found out turned me against farm raised salmon forever.  The following caught my eye:

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Not Your Ordinary Tuna Salad

This afternoon, when I went to the grocery store on a hunt for something good for dinner, I was walking down the tuna oil and a man was perusing the various cans of tuna. I made a remark that the Tonno Genova Tuna packed in olive oil had better taste, and was better for you, too. After I picked up my two cans, he put some in his basket as well.

There are some really good things about tuna packed in olive oil. First, because the tuna has more flavor, less mayonnaise is required, so according to [http://chickenofthesea.com/e_health_omega.aspx]

“It has been shown that tuna packed in oil mixed with 1 tablespoon of mayonnaise is actually lower in fat than tuna packed in spring water and mixed with 2 tablespoons of mayonnaise. Starting with tuna packed in oil allows people to use less mayonnaise to achieve the desired consistency and taste, thereby cutting down on fat and calories and providing a better tasting salad.”

In addition, olive oil is good for you http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olive_oil#Nutrition_and_health_effects:

“Olive oil contains the monounsaturated fatty acid oleic acid, antioxidants such as vitamin E and carotenoids, and oleuropein, a chemical that prevents the oxidation of LDL particles. It is these properties that are thought to contribute to the health benefits of olive oil”.

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