Just Say No to GMO Box Tops for Education

Say Hell No to Box Top$ for Education  GMO

Say “Hell No” to GMO Box Tops for Education

I don’t know about you, but it’s that time of year again. I got an email from my son’s school about a Box Tops for Education. I’m all for supporting my child’s school, but I’m not going to help grow these companies coffers at the expense of my, or any other, child’s expense.

Why Say No?

General Mills started Box Tops for Education in 1996. General Mills has contributed 525 million dollars to eduction. That’s about 29 million a year for 18 years. But, they also contributed $1,135,300.00 in November 2012 to help defeat California Prop 37 (Genetically Modified Food Labeling Initiative). In 2013, there were bills in 27 states to start labeling of GMO Foods. Of those 27, 6 were already defeated, 21 are still in process.

  • Colorado HB1192 was voted down
  • Maryland HB903 was withdrawn
  • Missouri HB246 was withdrawn and SB155 died
  • New Hampshire HB660 failed in 2014
  • New Mexico SB18 was voted down
  • Washington I-522 was defeated

Do the Math

If General Mills spent 1 million dollars in one state, California, they probably spent or are still spending 1 million for these other states as well. So, that’s about 27 million a year for those 27 states. There are 50 states in our Union, and I’m sure they are actively spending money in those states as well. There are 4 states, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maine, and Vermont that passed bills requiring labeling of GMO foods. That’s 46 states where General Mills is probably spending money to stop labeling, and at 1 million a year, per state, that’s 46 million a year, 17 million more than is going out for education. In my humble opinion, that stinks! Of course, I could be wrong, but I don’t think so.

What to Avoid

  • Betty Crocker
  • Gold Medal Flour
  • Yoplait
  • Bisquick
  • Pillsbury
  • Land 0 Lakes
  • Ocean Spray
  • Green Giant
  • Totino’s
  • Mott’s

You will notice that most of the foods listed here are prepared packaged foods that The Good Plate does not use, and I try to give you safe, homemade alternatives. If you look on labels, read ingredients, you can usually tell if it’s something to keep out of your kitchen. My motto is: “If I can’t pronounce it, I won’t buy it!”

Plastics, Too?

In July of 2013, the city that I live in banned plastic shopping bags in all major supermarkets and retailers. In January, 2014, the smaller shops had to comply as well. Why? Because plastic shopping bags don’t decompose and we have an island of trash in the Pacific Ocean, mostly composed to plastic bags. Guess what? Plastic bags are not indigenous to the Pacific Ocean.

Hefty garbage bags are eligible for Box Top$, too. Do they degrade? No, they just add to the existing garbage patch. Some estimates say the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is as large as the Continental United States. What can you do? Here’s what we’re doing in our house.

  • We’re using foil which can be wash and reused or recycled.
  • We’re using wax paper, which because it is paper, degrades
  • We’re reusing our plastic by washing it
  • We’re using paper bags from the supermarket for trash
  • We’re using glass for storage.
  • We’re using plastic food containers for food storage after thoroughly washing them.

Want to know more about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch? Check National Geographic and WikiPedia for more information.

What’s Safe?

If your children are driving you crazy because they want you to buy Box Top$ products, there are two things that you can buy, Cascadian Farms Cereal and Horizon Organic.

Conclusion

I hope that I have given you some food for thought. Please shop responsibly.

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7 Responses to Just Say No to GMO Box Tops for Education

  1. Costas says:

    Undoubtedly a wonderful written piece! I’ve book marked it and mailed it out to pretty much all of my close friends simply because I know they are going to be fascinated, thank you very much!

  2. Kimberly Kapphahn says:

    Thank you for posting this information here. I have a child in school, and wondered about those Box Tops. It is nice to know that there is something I can do to participate. I am also looking into other ways to help from other non-GMO sources.

  3. Tom says:

    We are a group of volunteers and starting a brand new scheme in our community. Your web site offered us with helpful info to paintings on. You have done a formidable task and our whole group can be grateful to you.

  4. Becky says:

    You’re incredible! Thanks! Your article about GMO and General Mills really opened up my eyes.

    • Adrienne Boswell says:

      Becky, thanks for stopping by. Don’t forget, there are still some things that you can get to help support your school. There are also some non-GMO companies that want to help schools, just Google for them.

  5. Tawny Suentenfuss says:

    This approach to education is interesting